arthritis shoulder exercise video

🔥+ arthritis shoulder exercise video 06 Jul 2020 RA is a symmetrical arthritis, meaning that it usually affects both sides of the body in a similar pattern, although this is not always the case. It tends to affect the ...

arthritis shoulder exercise video Read Dr. Holly L. Thacker's column on supplements for joint pain. ... The first time, I recommended the supplement several years ago I had a ...

To find out what to do if you think you have symptoms, please visit Coronavirus symptom checker. Or visit our encyclopaedia page, which has general information and includes a BSL video.

NOTE: For up for 1 last update 2020/07/06 to date information about Coronavirus (COVID-19) visit the UK Department of Health and Social Care.NOTE: For up to date information about Coronavirus (COVID-19) visit the UK Department of Health and Social Care.

<< Back to A-Z

Overview

Arthritis is a common condition that causes pain and inflammation in a joint.

In the UK, more than 10 million people have arthritis or other, similar conditions that affect the joints.

Arthritis affects people of all ages, including children.

Types of arthritis

Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are the 2 most common types of arthritis.

Osteoarthritis

arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis in the UK, affecting nearly 9 million people.

It most often develops in adults who are in their mid-40s or older.

It's also more common in for 1 last update 2020/07/06 women and people with a family history of the condition. It's also more common in women and people with a family history of the condition. 

But it can occur at any age as a result of an injury or be associated with other joint-related conditions, such as gout or rheumatoid arthritis.

Osteoarthritis initially affects the smooth cartilage lining of the joint. This makes movement more difficult than usual, leading to pain and stiffness.

Once the cartilage lining starts to roughen and thin out, the tendons and ligaments have to work harder.

This can cause swelling and the formation of bony spurs called osteophytes.

Severe loss of cartilage can lead to bone rubbing on bone, altering the shape of the joint and forcing the bones out of their normal position.

The most commonly affected joints are those in the 1 last update 2020/07/06 the:The most commonly affected joints are those in the:

  • hands
  • spine
  • knees
  • hips

Rheumatoid arthritis

arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for In the UK, rheumatoid arthritis affects more than 400,000 people.

It often starts when a person is between 40 and 50 years old. Women are 3 times more likely to be affected than men.

arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for In rheumatoid arthritis, the body's immune system targets affected joints, which leads to pain and swelling. 

The outer covering (synovium) of the joint is the first place affected.

This can then spread across the joint, leading to further swelling and a change in the joint's shape. This may cause the bone and cartilage to break down.

People with rheumatoid arthritis can also develop problems with other tissues and organs in their body.

Other types of arthritis and related conditions

  • ankylosing spondylitis – a long-term inflammatory condition that mainly affects the bones, muscles and ligaments of the spine, leading to stiffness and joints fusing together. Other problems can include the swelling of tendons, eyes and large joints.
  • cervical spondylosis – also known as degenerative osteoarthritis, cervical spondylitis affects the joints and bones in the neck, which can lead to pain and stiffness.
  • fibromyalgia – causes pain in the body's muscles, ligaments and tendons.
  • lupus – an autoimmune condition that can affect many different organs and the body's tissues.
  • gout – a type of arthritis caused by too much uric acid in the body. This can be left in joints (usually affecting the big toe) but can develop in any joint. It causes intense pain, redness and swelling.
  • psoriatic arthritis – an inflammatory joint condition that can affect people with psoriasis.
  • enteropathic arthritis – a form of chronic, inflammatory arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the two best-known types being ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. About one in five people with Crohn's or ulcerative colitis will develop enteropathic arthritis. The most common areas affected by inflammation are the peripheral (limb) joints and the spine.
  • reactive arthritis – this can cause inflammation of the joints, eyes and urethra (the tube that urine passes through). It develops shortly after an infection of the bowel, genital tract or, less frequently, after a throat infection.
  • secondary arthritis – a type of arthritis that can develop after a joint injury and sometimes occurs many years afterwards.
  • polymyalgia rheumatica – a condition that almost always affects people over 50 years of age, where the immune system causes muscle pain and stiffness, usually across the shoulders and tops of the legs. It can also cause joint inflammation.

Symptoms of arthritis

There are lots of different types of arthritis.

The symptoms you experience will vary depending on the type you have.

This is why it's important to have an accurate diagnosis if you have:

  • joint pain, tenderness and stiffness
  • inflammation in and around the joints
  • restricted movement of the joints
  • warm red skin over the affected joint
  • weakness and muscle wasting

arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for Arthritis and children

Arthritis is often associated with older people, but it can also affect children.

In the UK, about 15,000 children and young people are affected by arthritis.

Most types of childhood arthritis are known as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

JIA causes pain and inflammation in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks.

Although the exact cause of JIA is unknown, the symptoms often improve as a child gets older, meaning they can lead a normal life.

The main types of JIA are:

arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for Oligo-articular JIA

Oligo-articular JIA is the most common type of JIA. It affects up to 4 joints in the body, most commonly in the knees, ankles and wrists.

arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for Oligo-articular JIA often goes away without causing long-term joint damage.

But there's a risk that children with the condition may develop eye problems, so regular eye tests with an eye care specialist called an ophthalmologist are recommended.

Polyarticular JIA (polyarthritis)

Polyarticular JIA, or polyarthritis, is the second most common type of JIA and affects 5 or more joints.

It can affect a child of any age for 1 last update 2020/07/06 and may come on suddenly or develop gradually.It can affect a child of any age and may come on suddenly or develop gradually.

The symptoms of polyarticular JIA are similar to the symptoms of adult rheumatoid arthritis.

A child with the condition may also feel unwell and may occasionally have a high temperature of 38C or above.

arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for Systemic onset JIA

Systemic onset JIA begins with symptoms such as a fever, rash, a lack of energy and enlarged glands. Later on, joints can become swollen and inflamed.

Like polyarticular JIA, systemic onset JIA can affect children of any age.

Enthesitis-related arthritis

Enthesitis-related arthritis is a type of juvenile arthritis that often affects the joints of the leg and spine, causing inflammation where the tendons attach to the the 1 last update 2020/07/06 bone.Enthesitis-related arthritis is a type of juvenile arthritis that often affects the joints of the leg and spine, causing inflammation where the tendons attach to the bone.

It can cause stiffness in the neck and lower back in the teenage years.

It's also linked to a painful eye condition the 1 last update 2020/07/06 called acute uveitis.It's also linked to a painful eye condition called acute uveitis.

Versus Arthritis has more information about the different types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Treating arthritis

There's no cure for arthritis, but there are many treatments that can help slow it down.

Osteoarthritis treatments include lifestyle changes, medications and the 1 last update 2020/07/06 surgery.Osteoarthritis treatments include lifestyle changes, medications and surgery.

arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for Treatment for rheumatoid arthritis aims to slow the condition's progress and minimise joint inflammation. This helps prevent joint damage.

Treatments include medication, physiotherapy and surgery.

Further information and support

Versus Arthritis provides help and support for people in the UK with arthritis, plus their families and friends.

They have a free helpline you can call for further information and support on 0800 5200 520, Monday the 1 last update 2020/07/06 to Friday, 9am to 8pm.They have a free helpline you can call for further information and support on 0800 5200 520, Monday to Friday, 9am to 8pm.

^^ Back to top

Living with

Living with arthritis isn't easy and carrying out simple, everyday tasks can often be painful and difficult.

However, there are many things you can do to live a healthy lifestyle. A range of services and benefits are also available.

Work

Many people with arthritis want to continue working for many reasons, including better financial security and higher self-esteem.

arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for Improved treatment approaches have helped ensure that many people diagnosed with arthritis can return to work. This is particularly the case if arthritis is diagnosed and treated at an early stage.

You may find work challenging, but your employer should help you with the for 1 last update 2020/07/06 training and support you need.You may find work challenging, but your employer should help you with the training and support you need.

Help is also available if your for 1 last update 2020/07/06 arthritis is so severe that you're unable to work. Find out more about the Personal Independence Payment (formerly known as the Disability Living Allowance).Help is also available if your arthritis is so severe that you're unable to work. Find out more about the Personal Independence Payment (formerly known as the Disability Living Allowance).

Versus Arthritis has more information about working with arthritis.

arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for Healthy eating

It's very important for 1 last update 2020/07/06 to eat a healthy, balanced diet if you have arthritis. Eating healthily will give you all the nutrients you need and help you maintain a healthy weight.It's very important to eat a healthy, balanced diet if you have arthritis. Eating healthily will give you all the nutrients you need and help you maintain a healthy weight.

Your diet should consist of a variety of foods from all 5 food groups. These are:

  • fruit and vegetables
  • starchy foods – such as bread, rice, potatoes and pasta
  • meat, fish, eggs and beans
  • milk and dairy foods
  • foods containing fat and sugar

If you're overweight, losing weight can really help you cope with arthritis. Too much weight places excess pressure on the joints in your hips, knees, ankles and feet, leading to increased pain and mobility problems.

Read more about how you can lose weight.

Exercise

If your arthritis is painful, you may not feel like exercising. However, being active can help reduce and prevent pain. Regular exercise can also:

  • improve your range of movement and joint mobility
  • increase muscle strength
  • reduce stiffness
  • boost your energy

As long as you do the right type and level of exercise for your condition, your arthritis won't get any worse. Combined with a healthy, balanced diet, regular exercise will help you lose weight and place less strain on your joints. Your GP can recommend the type and level of exercise that's right for you.

Versus Arthritis has more information and advice about exercising with arthritis and exercises to manage pain.

Joint care

If you have arthritis, it's important to look after your joints to avoid further damage. For example, try to reduce the stress on your joints while carrying out everyday tasks like moving and lifting.

arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for To help protect your joints (particularly if you have arthritis):

  • use larger, stronger joints as levers – for example, take the pressure of opening a heavy door on your shoulder rather than on your hand
  • use several joints to spread the weight of an object – for example, use both hands to carry your shopping or distribute the weight evenly by using a rucksack
  • don't grip too tightly – grip as loosely as possible or use a padded handle to widen your grip

Versus Arthritis has more information and advice about managing your pain.

It's also important to avoid sitting in the same position for long periods of time and to take regular breaks so you can move around.

At home

If you have arthritis, carrying out tasks around the home can be a challenge. However, making some practical changes to your home and changing the way you work should make things easier.

Practical tips that could help include:

  • keeping things in easy reach
  • using a hand rail to help you get up and down the stairs
  • using long-handled tools to pick things up or to clean
  • fitting levers to taps to make them easier to turn
  • using electric kitchen equipment, such as tin openers, when preparing food

Versus Arthritis has more information and advice about living with arthritis.

Occupational therapy

An occupational therapist can help if you have severe arthritis that's affecting your ability to move around your home and carry out everyday tasks, such as cooking and cleaning.

They can advise about equipment you may need to help you live independently.

Depending on the exact nature of your condition, your GP may be able to refer you to an NHS occupational therapist. However, you may need to access this type of therapy through your local council. 

Find your local authority on GOV.WALES

Read more about occupational therapy.

Arthritis and driving

You only need to inform the DVLA if you have arthritis and use special controls for driving.

GOV.UK has more information and advice about telling the DVLA about a medical condition or disability.

Children with arthritis

Make sure your child eats healthily and exercises regularly. They need to maintain a healthy weight because being overweight can put strain on their joints and make their arthritis symptoms worse.

Having arthritis shouldn't stop your child leading a normal school life, but keep the school informed about your child's health so they can provide extra support if needed.

arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for Versus Arthritis has more information for parents of children with arthritis.

^^ Back to top

Selected links

NHS Direct Wales links

arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for Osteoarthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis

How to lead a healthy lifestyle

Search for local and national support organisations

External links

Arthritis Research UK: arthritis information

Arthritis Care: about arthritis

Arthritis Research: inflammatory arthritis pathway

Contact a Family: juvenile arthritis

Expert Patients Programme

British Pain Society - people living with pain

Pain Concern

^^ Back to top


The information on this page has been adapted by NHS Wales from original content supplied by NHS website nhs.uk
arthritis shoulder exercise videohow to arthritis shoulder exercise video for Last Updated: 25/09/2019 13:48:59

We value your feedback. Click here to complete our online survey